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Anyway, here's some of the information people have been looking for -

* These days, Scottish soldiers are usually known as “Jocks”. But until the early 19Century members of the Highland regiments were sometimes referred to as “Rories”.

* The 5th Battalion of the Seaforth Highlanders did not wear the usual regimental stag's head badge but instead sported the Sutherland clan's wild cat badge including the motto Sans Peur around the rim.

* The badge on the Tam o' Shanter Beatles drummer Ringo Starr wore in the 1965 movie Help! was that of the Lowland Brigade. It is reputed to have been borrowed from a member of the 1st Battalion of the Royal Scots, which was involved in the filming. 

* The Edinburgh-based Royal Scots did have a kilted battalion during the First World War. The 9th Battalion, was known as the Dandy Ninth. The Highland Light Infantry, which also usually paraded in trews before the war, also had a kilted battalion. The HLI's 9th Battalion was known as the Glasgow Highlanders.

* The Duke of Wellington joined the 73rd Highlanders in 1787, his first regiment, but quickly transferred to the 76th Foot.

* The Cameronians, as a Lowland unit, were not part of the 51st Highland Division's surrender at St Valery en Caux in 1940, but the 4th Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders were.

* Although the regiments of Highland Brigade were ordered to wear the same badge on their headgear between 1958 and 1968 all the regiments retained their own tartans. The Highland Light Infantry were lost to the brigade when they merged with the Royal Scots Fusiliers to form the Royal Highland Fusiliers in 1959 and the new regiment was assigned to the Lowland Brigade. The Camerons and Seaforths combined to form the Queen's Own Highlanders in 1961. The other members of the Brigade were the Black Watch, the Gordon Highlanders and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. The Highland Brigade badge can be seen at Photo Identification

* The old Scottish Division depot was at Glencorse Barracks, Penicuik, now home base for the Royal Highland Fusiliers, the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.  

* I wonder if the "bearskin" in the photo is not actually a sealskin busby of the type worn by the Royal Scots Fusiliers before the First World War. It should have a "flaming grenade" badge on the front.  

* The Highland Light Infantry were told during the Second World War to expect a draft of 200 men draft from the Royal Irish Fusiliers, a regiment based in Northern Ireland: The entire draft was made up of men from Yorkshire. During the First World War The Territorial Force's 5th Seaforth Highlanders, in peacetime recruited in Caithness and Sutherland, was brought up to combat strength with a very large contingent of men recruited in Manchester.

* Donald MacLeod from Skye claimed in a ghost-written book to have joined the Royal Scots around 1701 and retired from the army in 1776 at the age of 88 following a career which also saw him serve in the Black Watch and the Fraser Highlanders. 

* The only ostensibly Scottish Catholic regiment I can think of would be the Glengarry Fencibles (1795-1802) which was raised from the mainly Catholic Macdonnells of western Inverness-shire and their neighbours for home defence duties. Many of its members went to Canada en masse after the regiment was disbanded and established Glengarry County in what is now Ontario. 

* The grouping of buttons in threes on a scarlet tunic suggest it belonged to a soldier from the Scots Guards.

* The 1st Seaforth Highlanders and the 2nd Black Watch both suffered so many casualties in Mesopotamia that they formed a composite unit known as the  Highland Battalion between February and July 1916.

* No, no "Seaforth Argylls". But when the depleted 2nd battalion of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in Malaya was reinforced by Royal Marines in February 1942 the unit was known as the "Plymouth Argylls".

* A black hackle worn on a Tam o'Shanter once signified the wearer belonged to the Cameronians. However, No. 11 (Scottish) Commando during the early years of the Second World War also wore black hackles. The Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland,  now wear the black hackle on their Tam o'Shanters.

* The Atholl Highlanders claim to be Europe's only legal private army. It is made up of friends and retainers of the Duke of Atholl.

* The Cameronians, 26th Foot, were on garrison duty at Gibraltar at the time of Waterloo.

* Yes, the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) despite their strict Calvinist roots did include a number of Catholics.  

* The pipers of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards wear Royal Stewart tartan kilts.

*The 1st Battalion of the Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders were the last full Scottish battalion to go into action wearing kilts. That was in May 1940. On their return from France they were put into battledress trousers.

*The Scottish regiments which campaigned against the Zulus in 1879 were the 21st Royal Scots Fusiliers, the 90th Perthshire Light Infantry and the 91st Argyllshire Highlanders. The 99th Lanarkshire Regiment also took part but this was only two years before it morphed into the 2nd Battalion of the Wiltshire Regiment.

*The Royal North British Garrison Battalion, made up of military veterans unfit for frontline service during the Napoleonic Wars, were stationed at Edinburgh Castle, Fort George, Fort Charlotte and Fort Augustus

*The Highland Regiment was a short-lived (1942-1943) training unit made up of boys aged 16-18 who signed on for the regular army during the Second World War.

* No, the HLI did not wear trews in battle during the First World War. They wore standard issue khaki trousers.

*It’s hard to say which Scottish regiment won the most battles; but if battle honours awarded are any indication it would have to be the old Highland Light Infantry. Between them the old 71st and 74th Regiments, which formed the HLI’s two battalions, accumulated more battle honours on their regimental colours, 49, than any other Scottish regiment – this was mainly due to their early service in India and the Peninsular War.

* The Federal Army unit during the American Civil War which modelled itself on the Cameron Highlanders was the 79th New York Volunteer infantry.

* The Cameronians/Scottish Rifles would not have recruited directly in Yorkshire during the First World War but a Tyke could easily have found himself posted to the regiment.

* The battalion hackles for the Royal Regiment of Scotland are as follows - Royal Scots Borderers (Black); Royal Highland Fusiliers (White); Black Watch (Red); The Highlanders (Blue); Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Green); 52nd Lowland (Grey) and 51st Highland (Purple).

* The 75th Highlanders wore Government tartan, better known as Black Watch, from their foundation in 1787 until they lost their Highland status, and their kilts, in 1809.

* Although Scottish soldiers had been wearing Tam o'Shanters informally while on campaign for some years previously, the khaki versions were not officially issued until around 1915.

* I've never found any evidence that the 94th Scotch Brigade wore kilts during the Napoleonic Wars. The 1809 order which took away its "Highland" status and kilts may have been due to a bureaucratic mix-up, probably with the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders.

* When the Cameronians were disbanded in 1968 their recruiting area was turned over to the King's Own Scottish Borderers.

* The Scottish regiments at Waterloo were the Royal Scots Greys, the Scots Guards, the Royal Scots, the Highland Light Infantry, the 73rd Foot (later 2nd Black Watch), the Black Watch, the Cameron Highlanders and the Gordon Highlanders. The 91st Foot (later 1st Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) were guarding one of the flanks did not take part in the fighting.

* The old Territorial Army 15th Battalion of the Parachute Regiment wore a Hunting Stewart tartan patch on their maroon berets. Comedian Billy Connolly was perhaps one of the best known members of the unit.

*The Royal Artillery's 75th (Highland) Field Regiment morphed into the 75th Heavy Regiment (Highland) in 1943.

*I think there's been a mix-up and the regiment referred to is the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment; Lancashire, not Lanarkshire.

*Carey's Regiment, otherwise known as the 64th Foot, was stationed in the Highlands 1760-63.

*There's book about about former members of the German SS serving in Vietnam with the French Foreign Legion called "The Devil's Guard" by George Robert Elford. Some bookshops stock in the fiction section.

*The Black Watch abandoned their kilts when they fought in the American War of Independence, 1776-1783,in favour of canvas trousers and again in 1873 in Ghana when they took part in the campaign against the Ashanti. In the latter war the Highlanders were kitted out in grey-ish trousers and Norfolk-style jackets.

* No, the 26th Foot, better known as the Cameronians, was never a kilted regiment.

*The difference between the Mackenzie tartan worn by the HLI and the tartan worn by the Seaforths was that HLI sett was a little more open. The white over-stripes were seven inches apart, while on the Seaforth sett (No2) they were 5 ½ '' apart. The red overstripes in the HLI sett (No 5) were 14 inches apart, with the No.2 sett they were 11 inches apart. The white over-stripes on the No. 2 sett were edged in black but un-edged in the HLI sett. The blue, black and green stripes in the No. 5 sett are slightly wider than on the Seaforth sett.

* There would be nothing in the uniform of the Royal Scots at Waterloo in 1815 to distinguish them from the other British regiments of the line. The regiment wore the standard British infantry uniform with nothing to indicate its Scottish connections.

* The Argyllshire Regiment, later the 1st Battalion of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, did indeed have men on board the Birkenhead when it sank of South Africa in 1852. It lost 45 men from a draft 103 on board. The 73rd Regiment, later the 2nd Black Watch lost 56 out of a draft of 73 men and the 74th Highlanders, later 2nd Highland Light Infantry, suffered 50 dead out of the 63 men it had on the Birkenhead.

*The Lanarkshire Regiment (99th Foot) did not wear trews but the regiment’s pipers wore Graham tartan.

* The two Scottish regiments at the Battle of New Orleans in 1815 were the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders and the 21st Royal Scots Fusiliers.

* The kilted regiments at Waterloo in 1815 were the Black Watch, the Gordon Highlanders and the Cameron Highlanders

* A Scottish soldier wearing a green tunic and trews from the late 1800s or early 1900s is almost certainly a member of the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). The Rifle regiments of the time wore green rather than red tunics.

* The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada wore MacKenzie tartan kilts. Generally, the Highland units of the Canadian army were named in honour of British regiments and wore the tartans of their namesakes.

*The Lovat Scouts conducted mountain warfare training in Canadian Rockies, at Jasper, in 1944.

*The percentage of Scots serving with the Parachute Regiment obviously varies from one year to another; but in 1981 about 25% of recruits to the regiment were Scottish.

*The Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders were officially authorised to wear blue hackle in 1951 but some battalions wore them during the Second World War. The honour was supposedly in compensation for the substitution in 1940 of battle-dress trousers for their distinctive Cameron of Erracht kilts

*General Hector Macdonald killed himself in a Paris hotel room in 1903 while on his way back from London to Ceylon to answer allegations that he sexually abused young boys on the island.

*The Black Watch Glengarry had no dicing on it.

*The Highland Light Infantry had a white-over-red hackle from 1947 until 1959 when they merged with the Royal Scots Fusiliers:

*The isle of Lewis would have been in the Seaforth Highlanders' recruitment area from 1881-1961 and then it would have been inherited by the Queen's Own Highlanders after the Seaforths and the Cameron Highlanders were merged.

*If the kilt looks orange, then it's being worn by a piper from one of the Irish regiments.

*I don't think any battalion of the Gordon Highlanders would have recruited heavily in Paisley since well before the First World War. Paisley was allocated to the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders as part of its recruiting area in 1881:

*My guess is that if it's a double badge then you're looking at a collar badge from the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders:

*Those aren't antlers, they're thistles and it's the badge of the Cameronians/Scottish Rifles.

* When the Royal Scots Fusiliers first donned trews they were Government tartan (also known as Universal), then a black overstripe was added around 1914. After the Second World War the trews were Hunting Erskine, and following the amalgamation of 1958 to form the Royal Highland Fusiliers, Seaforth/MacKenzie.

*The Crucified Moose was the nickname of the Highland Brigade badge worn 1958-68

*The 4th Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland, continues the traditions of the Seaforth Highlanders, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, the Queen's Own Highlanders and the Gordon Highlanders.

 

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