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This happened a long long time ago; in the aftermath of the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in 2001. Many Americans believed, and still believe, that the terrorists infiltrated the USA from Canada. It wasn't true. But the Canadian authorities decided that immigrants should have modern identity cards instead of Landed Immigrant certificates. It took about a year to get the identity card system in place. I was working at the Edmonton Sun at the time. The day before all immigrants should have had their cards I was monitoring a television news bulletin at 6pm. One of the main stories involved a series of immigrants saying their had no idea about the identity cards or the deadline. They were all readers of the Sun's rival, the Edmonton Journal. When I reported the contents of the bulletin and the supposed identity card crisis to my boss, I made some crack along the lines "No surprise there, that what they get for thinking The Journal's a real newspaper." That's when my boss, a little English guy, dropped his bombshell. He hadn't applied for his identity card yet and didn't know he had to. What does a person who wants to keep their job say to that? Not only was the guy directly affected by the need to have an identity card but he was also supposed to be in the news business.

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We have a problem in Edmonton at the moment with the rich, or comparatively rich, robbing the poor. A sort of anti-Robin Hood. And it's a little old lady who is doing it. There are a large number of people in the city who sift through the bins looking for bottles, cans, and milk cartons. They then hand them in at bottle depots for the deposit money. A couple of weeks ago I saw a bottle-picker/dumpster-diver chasing a little light coloured car down a back street. I thought maybe the driver had cut too close the the bottle-picker and he was angry. But when I got up to the guy he told me the woman in the car had just snatched one of his bin bags full out cans and bottles and driven off. He'd left it beside a dumpster while he checked another one across the back alley. There was no way the woman thought the bag was just rubbish because she didn't stop to look inside before throwing it into her car. Nor did she stop when the outraged bottle-picker gave chase. Earlier this week I was chatting with another bottle-picker a couple of streets from the scene of that theft. It turned out he'd been a victim too. He said it was an old woman who snatched a bag containing the fruits three or four hours of bottle-harvesting. That's when I remembered that a little old lady had driven past me near the scene of the first theft. I had thought the car speeding off looked a little like the one that had just passed me, but thought it unlikely that a little old lady would be prowling the back streets robbing bottle-pickers. Wrong again. I fear this will not end well. 

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I'm guessing that excitement must be growing out there as the announcement of the winner of the  Book of the Year award approaches. There's going to be a slight change in format this time around. Some years offer a better crop of books to choose from. In other years, the pickings are distinctly sparse. There have been a couple of years in which a very strong contender has been pipped by an even stronger one and received no mention or credit. If I had read the runner-up a year later it would probably have won a Book of the Year award. In fact, a few weeks , say reading a book in January 2016 rather than November 2015, can make the difference. This is basically a long way of saying that from the 2017 Book of the Year onwards the short-listed books will be listed along with the winner. Seems fair.

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Here in Edmonton we just had a reasonable but not excessive dump of snow - two to three inches, bringing the total depth on uncleared surfaces to about five inches. In Britain, an inch of snow can bring transport to halt. I remember that when I worked in Inverness that a rumour that the Drummochter Pass might be closed by snow led to the shelves of the local supermarkets being cleared of bread and toilet paper. In Britain the cost of having fleets of heavy-duty snow clearing equipment on hand for the two or three days when there is a heavy snow fall just does not make economic sense. Several years ago, one Saturday, here in Edmonton we spotted way more than usual more people out walking on the streets after a heavy-ish snow fall. It took a while for the reason for this to dawn on yours truly. It was going to take 15 minutes to dig cars out of the snow. People who hop in their cars to make a journey which on foot would take 10 minutes decided it was quicker to walk than dig out their vehicle. There were a depressing number of people here who leap into their pollution spewing cars to drive two or three streets. The cars would have to be dug out to go to work on Monday but a Saturday car journey to buy a carton of milk just wasn't worth all that digging. I wonder if it snowed every Saturday of the year how much that would cut global warming. 

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What is it with failed journalists and armed robberies? Yet another journalist here in Alberta has been jailed for staging armed hold-ups. I used to work with reporter who was just out of jail after serving a sentence for armed robbery. My guess it has something to do with covering the courts and crime. Some journalists decide that years of covering crime gives them an insight into the subject. They think they know the nitty-gitty mechanics of an armed hold-up and where the bad guy who appeared in court went wrong. One thing that always struck me was that many of the robbers were well known to the police long before they took a gun, or a replica thereof, on the job with them. Someone with no criminal record might have an advantage. Another point that struck me was that most hold-up men staged at least three or four heists before their luck ran out. So, the odds of being caught could be reduced by committing only one or two heists and then quitting. Though inexperience and lack of proper violent menace might make the first outing more than a little risky. Journalists down on their luck seem prone to taking up the gun. Much the same thought must have struck Scottish crime writer, and journalist, Bill Knox. He wrote a crime story about a young journalist who decided he'd come up with a near perfect armed robbery. It did not work out well. Time and chance and all that. 

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